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>>> japan in crisis. high levels of radiation are escaping from a crippled nuclear power plant following another explosion and fire. japanese officials say the radiation is high enough to make humans sick. they're desperately pumping sea water into the reactors in a last ditch effort to overt disaster. meanwhile the scope of the devastation becomes more apparent as the death toll rises. this is the "cbs morning news" rises. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 15th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning the nuclear crisis triggered by last friday's massive earthquake is quickly getting worse. this morning there was an explosion at a third reactor at the fukushima daiichi power plant. it came after a fourth unit caught fire. that fire was extinguished. the levels were, quote, very high and now poses a threat to human health and there is a high risk that more radiation will escape. residents within 19 miles of the plant have been told to stay indoors. high than normal radiation levels have been detec
for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wondering where i am. we've been trying to make our way to the quake zone. the japanese military has taken over all the highways. obviously we're trying to steer clear of the nuclear power plant. we had to cut through the moun
, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the situation at japan's crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant has gone from critical to desperate. the plant has suffered severe damage and so far, efforts to gain control have failed. here's the latest. a surge in radiation levels forced the remaining workers at the plant to temporarily withdraw. early this morning, a second fire broke out at reactor number four. this one may involve the outer shell of the containment building. and japanese officials also say the outer containment building of another reactor may have been compromised. charlie d'agata is in takasaki japan with more this morning. he joins us. good morning, charlie, what's the latest there? >> good morning to you, betty. the latest is, thankfully, the fire is out, and the plant's operators said they've been able to stabilize the temperature and the pressure in that critical unit. the reactor has gone -- at the same time the japanese government said it's now time to ask the military for help. efforts to prevent a full-blown nuclear disaster suf
>>> disaster in japan. efforts to control that crippled nuclear power plant have failed. officials admit burying the reactors in cement may be the only option left. as japan remembers the devastating quake and tsunami that hit one week ago today, changing their country forever. >>> and the battle for libya. the u.n. security council gives the okay for international military action against moammar gadhafi's forces. military action against moammar gadhafi's forces. but is it too little, too late? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the nuclear crisis in japan moves into its second week. and this morning, the head of the u.n.'s nuclear energy agency says japan is racing against the clock. here's the latest. engineers hope to reconnect electricity to at least two of the reactors at the fukushima daiichi power plant sometime today. but, it is unclear if any of the cooling systems will work. smoke is rising from reactor number 2, but officials don't know why. fire trucks are now being used to spray water on the plant, and att
touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.89, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top one thousand. most of the victims drowned. nearly one thousand are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that damage includes a nuclear reactor in northeastern japan. radiation levels are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history trigger
>> schieffer: today on face the nation, a triple disaster of unimagined proportions in japan. first an earthquake and then the tsunami and the damage from what now looks like has set off a meltdown in one of the country's nuclear reactors. our correspondents are spread across japan, and we'll have the latest from overnight. it's all ahead on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs "face the nation" with cbs news chief washington correspondent bob schieffer. and now from cbs news in washington, bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. though the news this morning is not very good, not good at all, but here is the latest. the japanese prime minister said today that the disaster that had hit his country-- and we're quoting him directly here-- is the worst crisis for japan since world war ii. the death toll is now likely to go beyond 10,000 in just one state aalone. it turns out the quake damaged two nuclear reactors at a power plant on the coast, maybe three. one of them seems to be going through a partial meltdown which means radiation could leak. we have a team of
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. a massive military relief and recovery operation is under way in japan this morning, after that 8.9 magnitude earthquake that devastated the island. >>> an explosion at a nuclear power plant has raised fears of a meltdown. hundreds are dead, and that number will most certainly rise. we have full coverage "early" this saturday morning, march 12th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> video from less than 30 hours ago in japan, devastating earthquake, 8.9 magnitude. at this hour the official death toll almost 600. and there are other big problems looming this morning. welcome to "the early show" on this saturday morning, i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we will continue to follow this story as it develops throughout the morning. >> let's get right to the earthquake in japan of course. the quake is the fifth largest in recorded history. it was followed by a 23-foot high tsunami. the official death count is 574 dead. the number expected to rise considerably. almost 600 are still missing. there have been more than 125
on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and toda
>>> coming up next on eyewitness news, deadly disaster, new concerns of a nuclear meltdown in japan, while that country is still reeling from yesterday's powerful earthquake. >>> many marylanders wait to hear from loved ones in the devastation after the historic earthquake in japan. i'm weijia jiang, hear their story next. >>> game advocates thought 2011 would be their year. we'll explain what is standing in the way of legalizing same-sex marriage. >>> the skies are clear this morning, could we see some warmer weather on the horizon soon? meteorologist tim williams a the answer in his first warning weather forecast. eyewitness news saturday morning starts now. >>> we are getting a look at the scope of the devastation in japan this morning, as a massive rescue effort is underway to find survivors of the disaster that rocked the entire pacific. good morning, welcome to eyewitness news this saturday, i'm gigi barnett. we'll have more on the situation in a moment, but first. >> good morning to you. those pictures and this whole situation is as fascinating as it is horrible. it's one of
>>> disaster in japan. the crisis from friday's catastrophic earthquake and the tsunami that followed gets worse and worse. the death toll is surging. engineers are battling an expanding nuclear crisis that has forced the evacuation of nearly 200,000 people. the japanese armed forces are aiding in the search for thousands of missing. millions are without power or heat. and food and water are in short heat. and food and water are in short supply. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everyone, on a very busy monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. three days after the fact the earthquake disaster in japan continues to snowball. the death toll from the nuclear and humanitarian crisis all growing this morning. here's the latest. it's now estimated that at least 10,000 people were killed by friday's massive quake and the tsunami that followed. tens of thousands are missing. early this morning, there was another explosion at a nuclear plant 150 miles north of tokyo. and a third reactor is in jeopardy after losing its cooling capabilities. some radiation has leaked
of the disaster in japan. tim williams explains why this was so deadly. mary bubala explains. but we begin with randall pinkston. >> the massive tsunami swallowed entire villages. and left others burning through the night. the 23-foot wave, triggered by the largest earthquake ever recorded in japan, swept away cars, boats and buildings. in one coastal town alone, 1800 houses were destroyed or badly damaged. police in the city of sendai have already recovered three bodies. hundreds more are missing. the 8.9 magnitude quake, centered east of tokyo, hit just before 3:00. >> it was so strong. and the undalation of the -- undualation of the earth was so powerful, we had to actually kind of hang onto the side of our house. >> reporter: large buildings shook. the prime minister felt it inside parliament. more than 400 buildings in and around tokyo are without power. >> my workers are all staying in the office. there's no getting out. there's no trains going anywhere. >> reporter: a massive fire. and authorities have evacuated thousands of residents living near the nuclear plant, where the reactor
>> reporter: monday's hydrogen explosion in japan could be heard from miles. three reactors lost their cooling capacity. crews are rushing in sea water. some 200,000 people have been evacuated from a 12-mile area and the u.s. navy moved warships further offshore to avoid radiation exposure. the quake generated a tsunami. rescuers continue to search. entire neighborhoods have been wiped out. in one area a ship ended up on top of a building. homeowners aren't sure where to begin. >> i don't have money. broken. >> reporter: the united nations is helping to coordinate disaster relief. millions are without food and water and aid workers are having trouble getting through. >> reporter: planes were headed for the japanese mainland. makeshift shelters are jammed. people have top stand in line for water. in many towns with grocery stores, the shelves are timing -- are emptying out. many cities are without electricity because the reactors are off line which means millions will have to spend another night in the cold. >> the us sent nuclear experts. insurance companies said this could be th
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another explosion overnight rocks the crippled nuclear power plant, as concerns grow over a possible meltdown. along the shattered coastline, 1,000 bodies are found, as the death toll soars. the prime minister calling this japan's worst crisis since world war ii. millions today face another day with no power, no water, and no food. we have the very latest for you on the explosion, the survivors, and the worldwide humanitarian effort. "early" this monday morning, march 14th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and thanks for joining us on this monday morning. you can see, these are just some of the images which have been coming in, and frankly, they speak for themselves. they're just unimaginable. >> the devastation that we first saw here friday morning, and now, in the days after this disaster in japan, we continue to get more images, more video of exactly the impact that this is having on this nation and the people there. damage estimates in the tens of billions of dollars. but, of course you can't put a dollar figure on the
from the devastation, rescue workers dig by hand to the earthquake rubble in japan. >> concerns grow about a major nuclear meltdown. >>> i'm ky jackson. here is what people are talking about. >> double devastation. the earthquake tsunami death toll rose in japan and expected to get higher. scientists are trying to prevent another disaster, a nuclear meltdown. monday's hydrogen explosion at this japanese nuclear power plant could be heard for miles. three reactors have lost cooling capacity. crews are pumping in seawater to try and prevent a meltdown, but the water continues to evaporate. some 200,000 people have been evacuated from a 12-mile area, and the us navy moved warships further offshore to avoid radiation exposure. the quake triggered a tsunami that devastated japan's coast. rescue crews continue to search through the massive and widespread records. entire neighborhoods have been wiped out, and in one town, a ship ended up resting on top of a building. ohm homeowners trying to pick up the pieces aren't sure where to begin. >> i don't have the money. >> the united nations are
>>> this is the latest video from japan this morning, it shows the moment a wall of water from the tsunami rolled ashore last friday. overnight the death toll rose dramatically. the nuclear problems have become worse. in the last ten minutes we've learned of a problem at a third nuclear reactor in japan. our complete coverage will begin in a moment. first, it is the top of the hour, the 14th day of the hospital. not a bad day start overall. christie is in for sharon and meteorologist tim is in for marty in first warning weather. >> a calm start to the day. temperatures in the 30s, the skies are clear. temperatures will go up nicely as a result. intervals of clouds and sun, 50 degrees, partly cloudy skies. and ahead of showers tomorrow they'll be here by wednesday. we'll have your complete forecast in a few moments. >>> the rush for real going on right now. christie is in wjz traffic control. >> don, a busy morning out there. westbound 100 an accident there at the bw parkway slowing your drive down. in the towson area we have a water main break disruption baltimore avenue closed
will be talking about today. a race to stop a ticking time bomb. nuclear reactors in the japan is still heating up. as the corr's glow, they are summarizing the water, creating more pressure, which could cause another explosion or worse. charlie is reporting on the fears of a meltdown. >> reporter: efforts to prevent a full-blown nuclear disaster suffered a set back overnight. >> and theres have said to have been evacuated. >> reporter: a dangerous spike in radiation levels forced workers out of the nuclear power plant, but a short time levels, officials say that the levels came back down and the operations resumed. crews have been trying to cool the reactors since last week's earthquake and tsunami damaged the plant, but a change of explosions and fires made that job more difficult. yesterday, smoke billowed from one reactor after a blaze broke out. officials insist there is no reason to panic, but residents are not so sure. >> they are saying that we're safe, but it makes me wonder. >> reporter: here, less than 150 miles west, people are getting on with their daily lives, but they are worried
of the facility have been told to stay inside. japan has imposed a no-fly zone over that area for commercial air traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sor
moved warships further offshore. the quake triggered a tsunami that devastated japan's coast. rescue crews continue to search through the widespread wreckage. entire neighborhoods have been wiped out. in one town a ship ended up on top of a building. homeowners trying to pick up the pieces, don't know where to begin. >> i don't have money, broken. >> reporter: the united states is trying to coordinate the relief. many are without food and water and made workers are having trouble getting through. u.s. marines loaded planes headed for the japanese mainland. people have to stand in line for water. many towns that still have grocery stores, the shelves are emptying out. authorities are checking radiation levels. many cities are without electricity because the reactors are offline, which means millions will have top spend another night in the cold. randall pinkston, wjz eyewitness news. >> as japan prepares for the possibility of a meltdown, the tragedy is drawing attention to nuclear plants in the u.s., many wondering are we safe. mike hellgren reports on the heightened concern at three
in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10,000 have died in his province alone. and as the search goes on for victims, at least a thousand washed up on shore today. coffins and body bags are in short supply and crematoriums are overwhelmed. u.s. and other foreign aid is pouring in for the millions of survivors in need of food, water and housing. emergency shelters are overflowing. japan's central bank pumped billions of dollars into the country's economy to shore it up. the prime minister is taking charge of managing the nuclear crisis and he's asking the u.s. for technical expertise to cool the damaged reactors and prevent a meltdown. u.s. officials say experts see no scenario in which harmful levels of radiation will reach the united states. we have a team of correspondents deployed throughout japan tonight. first, celia hatton in fukushima >> reporter: japan's nuclear nightmare continues, a second hydrogen explosion at the fukushima
its highest level in two weeks. while the nasdaq gained 14. >>> the disaster in japan is forcing toyota to slow its production here in the u.s. the world's biggest automaker told employees and dealers wednesday that due to supply disruptions from asia, it expects to halt production at some u.s. factories. the company did not indicate the size or pace of the slowdown, but it is expected to be somewhat limited since most toyotas made in this country use parts made in america. >>> new worries this morning about the housing market, after sales of new homes fell to the lowest on record. sales fell 17% in february, the third straight monthly decline. and the worst since they started keeping records 50 years ago. the median home sale price fell to $202,000. in response, many builders are cutting their prices and building less expensive homes. >>> united and continental airlines are finally rolling out in-flight wi-fi. they are the last major carriers to offer the service to most of their passengers. the two airlines merged last year. 95 live tv stations will also be available. >>> and b
>>> a nuclear nightmare, japan's deadly earthquake spark as nuclear crises. >> right now the rescue teams are sphoiching for survivors as they brace for more problems. >> hello, again. i'm don scott. >> and here is what people are talking about today. the situation in japan is just getting worse. thousands are dead and millions are struggling to survive in the aftermath of the earthquake and the tsunami. right now everyone is scrambling to prevent a nuclear catastrophe. another explosion at a power plant has happened and randall pinkston has the latest for wjz. >> reporter: the second explosion at a crippled power plant in northern japan sent a huge column of smoke into the sky. the officials say all three reactors at the complex are in jeopardy of total meltdown. more than 1 80,000 have been evacuated from a 12-mile area and many outside that zone are also leaving. >> we would like to be further away from there. >> reporter: in the hard hit city, the government troops are picking through mountains of rubble searching for survivors. thousands here are missed and feared dead. across
northern japan, collapsing buildings, spawning fires, and causing a major tsunami that brings death and destruction to dozens of cities. that tsunami now moving across the pacific ocean. the entire west coast, from hawaii to alaska, is under a tsunami warning. this morning, we are live in japan with the very latest on the damage, and we'll tell you just how much of the u.s. could be at risk. "early" this friday morning, be at risk. "early" this friday morning, march 11th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> those pictures and that sound give you a very good idea of just what people in japan are dealing with this morning. those shots, of course, of the magnitude 8.9 quake which hit just about 2:46 local time. >> the images, as you can see, are devastating. and that quake triggered a tsunami. some waves reported as high as 30 feet high, and that wall of mud just sweeping away everything in its path right now. the death toll in the area is on the rise. buildings in tokyo, which are currently on fire right now, 4 million buildings in the region without power. so this is a devastating sit
>>> a devastating earthquake triggers a tsunami that slams into japan. >> killing others and carrying away homes, cars and buildings, putting the west coast of the u.s. on a tsunami watch. >> hi. i'm kai jackson. >> and i'm mary mary bubala. here's what people are talking about. >>> one of the biggest earthquakes ever unleashes a tsunami on japan. and it is putting the nations around the pacific ocean on alert. sandra hughes has concerns on the u.s. west coast. yet we begin with randall pinkston, reporting for wjz on the widespread devastation. >> reporter: the massive tsunami swallowed entire villages on japan's northeast coast and left others burning through the night. the 23-foot wave, triggered by the largest ever in japan, swept away by cars, boats. in one coastal town alone, 1800 homes were badly damaged or destroyed. they have recovered 300 bodies. hundreds more are missing. the quake centered around northeast of tokyo. >> it was so strong. and the undulation of the earth was so powerful that we actually had to kind of hang onto the outside of our house. >> reporte
in chile the president travels to el salvador. >>> to japan now. this morning workers are evacuated, or were evacuated from the tsunami stricken fukushima daiichi nuclear plant and smoke was seen rising from one of the reactors. there's been a dramatic jump in the estimated death toll from that massive earthquake and tsunami eleven days ago. police now estimate more than 18,000 people were killed. charlie d'agata has the story. >> reporter: beneath this pile of rubble a much-needed sign of hope. crews pulled an 80-year-old woman and her teenage grandson out alive, nine days after japan's earthquake and tsunami destroyed their home. reports say the two had been trapped in their kitchen, and survived by eating yogurt and other food found in the refrigerator. the dramatic rescue provided a rare bit of good news for a nation reeling from its worst disaster since world war ii. positive developments also emerged from the fukushima nuclear power plant, where engineers are racing to prevent a full-blown meltdown. two of the facility's six reactors are now under control. and crews plan to so
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
jackson. here's what people are talking about. >> radiation race against time. japan is rushing to contain leaks from a nuclear power plant. aftershocks continue to rock the area destroyed by last week's earthquake and tsunami. >> reporter: engineers may call on u.s. and japanese troops at the nuclear plant. a third explosion and fire at the complex sent dangerous levels of radiation into the air. japan's prime minister is urging calm. but 140,000 people living near the plant to seal themselves indoors. >> it's very traumatic. and the main thing is we don't know what to do. >> reporter: plant officials may ask military helicopters to spray water on a storage pond so it won't release any more radiation. about 70,000 people within 12 miles. plant have been evacuated. others outside that zone are also leaving. >> everyone is scared for their child's sake and just trying to get their kids out first. >> reporter: the head of u.n.'s nuclear watchdog agency called the events worrying and said he's sending a team of experts to help. >> reporter: another powerful aftershock rocked japan after night
impact. the earthquake in japan triggers a tsunami and leaves hundreds dead. >>> hello, i'm yes, sir and here's what people are talking about today. it's a scene of devastation in japan in a wake of a monster earthquake. 200 are confirmed dead and many more are still missing. the quake triggered powerful tsunamis. the waves hit several countries. wjz has coverage of the event. tim williams is tracking the tsunami and we'll begin with the latest on the situation in japan. >> reporter: the massive tsunami crashed on to the north east coast of japan swallowing villages. the 23-foot wave swept away boats, homes and cars. residents fled to rooftops to escape the water and mood. the police have found 300 bodies in sendai. they're having a hard time getting a handle on the scale of destruction. the earthquake unleashed shortly before 3:00. >> the floor was shaking like a carnival ride. you never knew when it would stop. >> reporter: downtown, large buildings shook and workers poured into the streets. cameras captured the moment that is the quake hit. they've never experienced anything like
personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regime's ground troops are working and coalition forces are ready to expand the u.n.'s no fly zone t
. in japan at least 20,000 are now dead or missing in the earthquake. we'll hear from our correspondents in both places, plus the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mike mullen, richard lugar ranking republican on the senate foreign relations committee and massachusetts congressman ed markey, a voice on the environment. it's all ahead on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs "face the nation" with cbs news chief washington correspondent bob schieffer. and now washington, bob schieffer. good morning again. here is the news from overnight on the two extraordinary stories. in libya, moammar qaddafi says every person in the country will be armed and tells his people to prepare for a long war. u.s., french, and british planes are bombing key military targets in libya after u.s. and british ships fired more than 100 missiles at anti-aircraft sites yesterday. in japan radiation has showed up in tap water as far away as tokyo. japan says one of the reactors was so damaged, it will have to be scrapped and as casualties mount, one miraculous story, an 80-year-old woman and a te
>>> breaking news. a monster earthquake rocks japan overnight, touching off a massive tsunami that wiped out vast areas. tsunami warnings have been issued for most of the pacific, including hawaii. the earthquake triggered fires that are burning out of control along japan's east coast. transportation is disrupted, and emergency crews are being mobilized as officials only emergency crews are being mobilized as officials only begin to count the casualties. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. a monster earthquake struck japan this morning, triggering a devastating tsunami that swamped a wide patch of the japanese coastline, causing widespread damage, and some major damage, as well. the 8.9 magnitude quake was centered off the northeast japan coastline, about 240 miles northeast of tokyo. it is the biggest quake to hit japan in 140 years. the pictures, they are stunning. take a look. you can see the fires that are still burning at this hour. also, a 13-foot tsunami wave rolled inland, sweeping away everything in its pa
of silence in japan. the u.s. is helping to coordinate relief effort. >> reporter: in the town of ofanatu, british and american rescue crews are searching for survivors. >> trying to access underneath. obviously, you can see very, very difficult conditions. chances of survival. >> reporter: crews continue to recover bodies from the wreckage. many times, family members are there to mourn their loved ones. randall pinkston, wjz eyewitness news. >>> the u.s. government says military pilots cannot go within 50 miles of the reactor. pilots flying within 70 miles are taking potassium iodide tablets. >>> if a disaster hits the east coast, the situation in japan could play out right here in maryland. wjz is live. mike hellgren explains how local officials are preparing for the worst. mike? >> reporter: mary, they're constantly reviewing plans. they have a number of real-life drills and exercises and say they plan to learn what's happening in japan right now. >> reporter: floods. hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes. the three nuclear plants, closest to baltimore are vulnerable to them all. and
at the complex sent dangerous levels of radiation into the air. japan's prime minister is urging calm but ordered 140,000 people living near the plant to seal themselves indoors. >> it's very traumatic. and the main thing is we don't know what to do. >> reporter: plant officials may ask military helicopters to spray water on a fuel storage pond, so the rods inside don't release more radiation. some u.s. military crews making relief flights may have already been exposed. about 70,000 people within 12 miles of the plant have been evacuated. others outside that zone are also leaving. >> everyone is scared for their child's safety. and trying to get their kids out first. >> reporter: the head of the u.n. called worrying and said he's sending a team of experts to help. >>> another powerful aftershock rocked japan as night fell. the scale of destruction is already testing the country's limits. in the northeast, some 450,000 people are in temporary shelters, including american steve corbit. >> it's pretty desperate. it's kind of like a camping field. but with a lot of grief. >> reporter: survivors stand
on the power plant in japan. crews remain working around the clock to keep it in check. mike hellgren is following the massive evacuations. but first, joel brown reports for wjz from washington, where the white house is watching the situation very closely. >> reporter: emergency workers turn to a high-powered water cannon. while military helicopters dropped in sea water from above. this is the battle to keep nuclear fuel rods from overheating at the fukushima plant. since the earthquake and tsunami, four of the complex's six nuclear reactors have seen fires, explosions, damage, and even possible meltdown. utility companies incyst -- insist workers are making headway. anyone getting close enough to the plant could get a potentially fatal dose of radiation. they have passengers checking in cargo, coming in from japan. but japan's nuclear regulator says there is no big concern. >> basic science tells us that there can't be any risk or harm to anyone here in the united states, or hawaii or any of the other territories. >> reporter: the white house is standing behind its warning to america
>>> unrest. concerns are mounting about japan's nuclear crisis. >> why several nations are preparing for radio active fallout. >> the situation in japan continues to worsen as cruise try to reverse what happened. wjz has complete coverage for you. mike hellgren with how maryland is taking a closer look at the nuclear facilities here and near by first, randall pinkston with more on the situation in japan. >> reporter: japanese military helicopters carrying water buckets hovered over the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant. the problems are not simple enough to be fixed by water dumbs. another fire and high radiation levels temporarily forced crews to leach wednesday morning but they were ordered to return several hours later. about 50 workers have been trying to cool fuel rods. earlier in the day white smoke could be seen rising. thousands of worried residents are fleeing. many are frustrated over the lack of information. >> it's very traumatic. >> reporter: the united nations and the u.s. government have both spent teams to japan to deal with the nuclear crisis. more than 9
anniversary where workers gathered outside of the three mile island plant. those offered prayers to japan. mary, back to you. >>> thank you, the final death toll is expected to reach 18,000 with hundreds of thousands still homeless. >>> the united states government confirms small amounts of radiation have made its way to america. derek valcourt has more on what is being done about it. >> reporter: radiation levels found in the u.s. are minuscule. so small that the state and government are urging people not to worry about it. it's a long trip from the site of the disaster to hear in the united states. some radiation has made it. sunday, federal officials announce a radioactive form of iodine that's been detected in rain water in pennsylvania and further north in massachusetts. the epa says that those radiation levels are about 25 times below the level that would be of concern for the most vulnerable infants and pregnant women. >> it's much less still than a regular plane flight. if you get an x-ray, that's highier radiation. >> reporter: the state health officials say that the routine amou
. the massive tsunami working its way through japan. these are some of the most incredible pictures we've seen from sendai japan. charlie d'agata has more. >> reporter: it looks like -- a wall of water raced across the farmlands sweeping cars and buildings aside. a massive earthquake triggered a tsunami that washed away everything in its path. the cars bobbed in the port city. as another wave sparked near sendai. one oil refinery was also struck. a government spokesman urged people to stay calm. office workers were caught in swaying buildings in the capital. japan's prime minister was addressing parliament the moment it hit. they're used to earthquakes in japan, but this was the largest in 140 years. >>> the warning center issued a warning for hawaii stretching to taiwan and indonesia and russia, columbia and peru. there was a tsunami watch for the western coast of the united states and canada from the mexican border to alaska. the height of the waves could be highier than some low lying places in the pacific. the un has 30 search and rescue teams are on alert. >> the event is taking japan by
people will be talking about today. a race against the clock is continuing in japan as the damaged nuclear reactors continue to heat up. the u.s. is ordering people who live within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate or stay indoors, twice the dangerous zone reported by the japanese. here's charlie d'agata. >> reporter: military helicopters launched an all out water assault pan japan's crippled nuclear power plant. crews are racing to finish a new power line that could restore crucial water pumps, the best option to cool dangerously hot reactors and prevent a nuclear meltdown. >> my confidence is eroded because of this continual almost daily degradation of the structure they have there. >> reporter: the facility has been plagued by a series of explosions and fires sense last week's earthquake and tsunami knocked out power. newly released images shows the damage to reactor four. japan is denying u.s. claims that same reactor has no more water in the spent fuel pools, meaning there's nothing to keep the fuel rods from melting down. >> we believe radiation levels are extremely high whic
for sometime. wjz has complete coverage of the disaster in japan. tim williams is tracking the tsunami that ripped through the pacific. yet we begin with randall pinkston with the latest on the damage in japan. >>> >>> the massive saw su -- tsunami left people burning through the night. it swept away cars, boats and buildings. in one coastal town alone, 1800 houses were destroyed or badly damaged. police in the city of sendai have already counted some 300 bodies. hundreds more are missing. the 8.9 magnitude quake, centered about 340 miles northeast of tokyo, hit just before 3:00. >> it was so strong. and the undalation of the earth was so powerful that we actually had to kind of hang onto the outside of our house. >> reporter: large buildings shook. the prime minister felt it inside parliament. more than 4 million buildings in and around tokyo are without power. >> my workers are all just staying in the office. i can't get out. there's no trains going anywhere. >> reporter: a massive fire raised at this power plant. and authorities have evacuated thousands of residents, living near nuc
>>> good morning. one week after the devastating quake and tsunami that ravaged japan, smoke continues to pour from a crippled nuclear power plant there, as the government raises the level of danger. the first american evacuees have been flown out of the country. while president obama is urging west coast residents not to worry about radiation plume expected to reach the u.s. later today. >>> also this morning another major story unfolding. the u.n. backed libya's rebels approving a no-fly zone and clearing the path for military action against moammar gadhafi as early as today. we'll bring you the very latest from both libya and japan, "early" this friday morning, march 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you, i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. good morning to you. following two major stories on the "early" show this morning. >> of course we're looking at japan. but libya, as we mentioned briefly, the u.n. security council voting to approve that no-fly zone. as you can imagine, there are some strong reaction from moamma
than 40 nations to discuss libya. >>> frustration is grow anything japan. it's been more than two weeks since the earthquake in japan. here's the report from new york. >> reporter: japan's prime minister defended the government's actions after the earthquake and tsunami damaged the plant. opposition lawmakers and parliament weren't convinced. you're the prime minister, said this politician, what were you thinking when you ran out of the office? today, the workers continue trying to remove the highly radioactive water. and there's a new concern, the presence of plutonium in the ground nearby. in washington, the u.s. energy commission's top nuclear expert told the committee, they're slowly recovering and the presence of pollute tone yum is ex-- plutonium is expect and not to be alarming. >> it's not in significant levels. >> reporter: the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission is reviewing safety commissions at nuclear plants in america. one of the most significant concerns is how to handle a power loss at a plant. radiation is being checked in japan again. >> we probably don't get close enou
japan, as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plant. this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say, and recommend that americans stay 50 miles away. and this morning, there are questions about nearly two dozen u.s. nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers japanese military helicopters, chinooks dropping sea water on this nuclear plant. again, a part of this last-ditch effort to bring sea water in to help cool down these fuel pools, and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. we're also hearing from water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we're also learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situat
the devastating earthquake, we are learning more about the human toll of the disaster in japan. our correspondents on the ground will be reporting the latest on the aftermath all through the morning, including bill whitaker who has been traveling through the worst of the stricken areas along with lucy craft and ben tracy in tokyo. >> reporter: the scale of the destruction and human misery is almost too much to comprehend. one of the most modern and technologically advance society on earth thrown back virtually to the stone age by the most powerful and unpredictable of natural forces. ahead this sunday morning we take a measure of the disaster in japan. >> osgood: then it's on to a new technology, a hand held technology with almost unlimited potential. in any sort of communication or information path you want, the chances are there's an app for that as daniel sieberg will be showing us. >> reporter: more than 11 billion apps were downloaded in 2010 and apps do seem to be everywhere these days, but app- planet? from navigating in your car to mapping the human body to exploring the stars, it seems th
:00. >>> crippled nuclear plant in japan. wjz has complete coverage. alex demetrick has complete support. one week after the earthquake and tsunami, the relief effort is being overshadowed by the fears of a nuclear disaster. >>> white smoke billowed from one of four damaged reactors, as crews frantically work to restore power at the crippled plant. they're trying to restart cooling pumps and prevent a total meltdown. but it's unclear whether the systems will operate when the electricity is restored. new video shows extensive damage. japanese officials responded to criticism that they're downplaying the severity of radiation leaks. >> on friday, the government acknowledged they were slow to respond to the crisis. test flights show the worst contamination has not spread past the 19-mile evacuation zone. >> nuclear radioactivity was dangerous. harmful for human health. in other cities, like in tokyo, it is not the case. >> reporter: but many in tokyo are leaving. forecasters say shifting winds could push radiation toward the capital over the weekend. >> united nation scientists who are currently in j
in libya, as rebel forces continue gaining ground. >>> radiation risk. levels at japan's crippled nuclear power plant reach record highs. and traces of radiation show up in massachusetts' rain water. >>> and if the slipper fits. virginia commonwealth university makes a stunning cinderella run virginia commonwealth university makes a stunning cinderella run to the final four. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, good to see you on this monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. we begin in libya this morning, under an umbrella of international air strikes, rebel forces are moving west this morning towards the capital of tripoli. allied air raids targeted moammar gadhafi's hometown sirte. there are unconfirmed reports that the city has fallen into rebel hands. earlier, rebel forces resigned control of two key oil ports, ras lanuf and brega. nato is assuming command of all aerial operations in libya from the u.s. and tonight president obama will address the nation to discuss the u.s. mission in libya. joel brown is in washington with more. joel, good morning to you. >> t
,,,, >>> crippled by disaster, thousands now feared dead in japan. [ sirens ] the crisis growing worse by the minute. we have a lot of breaking news coming out of japan tonight. first officials confirmed there has now been an explosion at one of the country's nuclear plants. these are live pictures from japan. we also learned a few moments ago that 2000 bodies were discovered washed up on a beach. here's the latest from japan. >> reporter: images from overhead show the nearly decimated poor town of minamisaricu. dramatic pictures of the impact shows the same town being swept away. destruction is everywhere. survival tales are emerging as well. this man jumped in a cab telling the man to outrun the incoming tsunami. >> he wanted to stop at stop signs i just said go. >> reporter: and a man carried out to sea on the roof of his home was rescue. two u.s. aircraft carriers are at the ready. american rescue teams with sniffer dogs have arrived to search for survivors. helicopters are delivering food and supply. many are still without food and water. stores here in tokyo have been strip
are coming out of japan. right now, it's believed there is a major radiation leak coming from that nuclear plant damaged in last week's earthquake. just a short thyme ago, japan's prime minister warned anyone living within 19 miles of the plant to stay inside. tonight, charlie d'agata reports for wjz from tokyo. >> reporter: troubles worsen in japan's fukushima plant. this one at unit 2. radiation levels shot up. nuclear rods in that reactor overheated on monday. 11 workers were injured. japan has asked for expert help but officials are downplaying the severity. >> no, it will manage. >> reporter: residents still in the area of fukushima were evacuated. this shelter is at capacity. and thousands of people were screened for radiation exposure. my biggest concern, she says, is nuclear radiation. it will jeopardize our health. while the fear of radiation hangs in the air, on the ground it's aftershocks. some of them powerful enough to be considered earthquakes in their own right that threaten a nuclear -- the nuclear problem and hamper rescue efforts. [ sirens ] >> reporter: that's the down o
inside the home were able to escape. >>> just an hour ago, a big jump in the death toll. police in japan now estimate that 18,000 people are dead. on a more positive note officials tonight report progress in the battle to prevent a nuclear catastrophe. here is the latest. >> reporter: a much needed sign of hope beneath this rubble. crews pulled an 80-year-old woman and her grandson out of the rubble nine days after the tsunami destroyed their home. the two had been trapped in their kitchen and survived by eating yoghurt and other food in their refrigerator. positive developments also emerged from the fukushima nuclear power plant. two of the facilities' six reactors are now under control and crews plan to soon restart critical water pumps needed to cool hot reactors but pressure in another unit spiked forcing officials to release more radio active steam. while there are scenes of progress at the nuclear plant, residents face new fears after traces of contamination were found in the food supply. tainted spinach and milk turned up at nearby farms. in one village, residents are asked not to
and confusion. thousands rush to get out of japan. >> radiation risks grow. tonight, the nuclear crisis puts the world on edge. >> hi, i'm kai jackson. in and -- >> and i'm jessica kartalija. mary is off tonight. >> as each day passes, they worry that there will be radiation leaked in japan. we start with joel brown for the latest on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: emergency workers turned to a high-powered water canyon. while military helicopters dropped in sea water from above. this is the battle to keep nuclear fuel rods from overheating at the fukushima plant. since the tsunami, four of the nuclear reactors have seen fires, explosions, damage, and even partial meltdowns. utility companies insist, workers are making headway. but united states officials believe anyone getting close enough to the plant could face a deadly dose of radiation. the threat of exposure has u.s. authorities checking passengers and cargo coming from japan. but some say there's no cause for concern. >> basic physics and basic science tells us that there can't be any risk to anyone here in the united states or hawai
has more on how japan is racing to contain the damaged from the power plant. >>> engineers may call on u.s. and japanese troops to help with the growing crisis at the nuclear plant. a third explosion and fire at the complex sent dangerous levels of radiation into the air. japan's prime minister is urging calm. but ordered 140,000 people living near the plant to seal themselves indoors. >> it's very traumatic. and the main thing is we don't know what to do. >> reporter: plant officials may ask military helicopters to helicopters to spray water on a fuel storage pond. so the rods inside don't release radiation. >> reporter: some have already been exposed to low levels of radiation. about 70,000 people within 12 miles of the plant have been evacuated. others outside that zone are also leaving. >> everyone is scared for their child's sake. and just trying to get their kids out first. >>> the head of the nuclear watchdog agency called the developments worrying. and said he's sending a team of experts to help. >> reporter: another powerful aftershock rocked japan as night fell. the scale
of radiation move south. this as japan's emperor makes a rare appearance on tv to mourn the losses and praise the relief efforts. and the list of the dead and missing is growing, now topping 11,000, "early" this wednesday missing is growing, now topping 11,000, "early" this wednesday morning, march 16th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning. you are looking at pictures of what so much of the world is focused on this morning. and that is that nuclear plant in fukushima, as we monitor the situation, which is fluid, is probably putting it mildly. >> every hour there's a new development there, as the people at fukushima, at this nuclear reactor, are doing all they can to contain a full-scale nuclear emergency right now. we keep hearing the stories of now being called the faceless 50. 50 employees or so that are basically evacuated and moved back in. the last 50 that are really there to avert a massive nuclear disaster. now we wonder if these poor people are really kind of paying with their lives. what is the situation like. >> and looking at the last line of defense and how much lo
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